Tag: Championship

PA, NJ See Uptick In Online Poker Championship Entries

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While we’re not out of the woods yet, states across the country are beginning to ease restrictions surrounding the coronavirus pandemic.

Some will soon allow select businesses to reopen, of course with capacity limitations and social distancing guidelines in place.

Online poker and online casinos have thrived during the shutdown, but major sports remain sidelined and casinos remain closed.

On that note, on to the Rewind:

Online poker tourneys crush in PA, NJ

We expected online poker to pick up steam as stay-at-home orders permeated the country. Perhaps no better example of this occured via PokerStars in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

The inaugural Pennsylvania Spring Championship of Online Poker, featuring 50 distinct events, boasted prize pools totaling a whopping $3.2 million. Prior to the championship’s start, PokerStars dog-eared guarantees up to $2 million.

With more than 56,000 players and over 23,000 re-entries, PASCOOP finished with a total nearing 80,000 entries. The Main Event (High) carried a $200,000 guarantee, one that was easily topped as 1,315 entries pushed the prize pool to $368,200. The winner left with a cool $57,000.

Days later, the New Jersey Spring Championship of Online Poker, also hosted by PokerStars, posted similar figures.

Nearly $1.8 million was awarded in 96 events that featured over 33,000 entries, easily becoming the most successful tourney in the championship’s five-year history in the Garden State.

New Jersey’s Main Event itself included 620 entries that led to a $173,600 prize pool. The champ pocketed more than $30,000.

Michigan casinos struggling amid pandemic

It’s no secret that the nation’s retail gaming industry has suffered immensely since the coronavirus forced shutdowns. Michigan provides a microcosm of the struggle.

Bridge Magazine published a report detailing the continued closures of the state’s 23 tribal casinos, which have been shuttered since March 22 and will remain as such until at least May 15.

While other states have benefited from online gambling to at least maintain some sort of revenue stream, Michigan has land-based gaming only, for now. As such, the tail end of March and April concluded without a single legal wager made.

Without operational casinos, tribes are unable to fund services such as health, education and law enforcement, among other areas. Really, casinos provide a vast majority of funding for tribes.

For example, Bridge noted that as much as 60% of the budget for the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community stems from the Ojibwa Casino. Similarly, some 75% of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe is backed by gaming revenue.

The rest of the state certainly misses casinos, considering those properties have contributed more than $30 million to local governments and over $54 million to the state in 2019.

Some relief coming for smaller casinos

While the pandemic has made it difficult for businesses to stay afloat, the Small Business Administration recently updated its guidelines for Payroll Protection Program loans that exclude small US gambling businesses.

Translation: Smaller casinos could receive loans to pay wages, utilities and rent during the shutdown.

The update came as Congress funneled $310 billion to fund the program.

Initially, “small businesses” were defined as establishments with less than 500 employees, which makes them available to receive up to $10 million or 2 ½ months of payroll, whichever is less. The trouble, however, stemmed from the SBA classifying gambling businesses as risky and “of poor character,” thus preventing that industry from receiving aid.

Now, though, guidelines dictate that any business eligible for a loan is not be overlooked based on gambling-related income.

That said, those businesses must vie with many, many others in various industries to acquire such help. Some 30 million small businesses exist in the country, and the money released by Congress is enough for just 31,000 loans at the max payout.

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PA, NJ See Uptick In Online Poker Championship Entries

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While we’re not out of the woods yet, states across the country are beginning to ease restrictions surrounding the coronavirus pandemic.

Some will soon allow select businesses to reopen, of course with capacity limitations and social distancing guidelines in place.

Online poker and online casinos have thrived during the shutdown, but major sports remain sidelined and casinos remain closed.

On that note, on to the Rewind:

Online poker tourneys crush in PA, NJ

We expected online poker to pick up steam as stay-at-home orders permeated the country. Perhaps no better example of this occured via PokerStars in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

The inaugural Pennsylvania Spring Championship of Online Poker, featuring 50 distinct events, boasted prize pools totaling a whopping $3.2 million. Prior to the championship’s start, PokerStars dog-eared guarantees up to $2 million.

With more than 56,000 players and over 23,000 re-entries, PASCOOP finished with a total nearing 80,000 entries. The Main Event (High) carried a $200,000 guarantee, one that was easily topped as 1,315 entries pushed the prize pool to $368,200. The winner left with a cool $57,000.

Days later, the New Jersey Spring Championship of Online Poker, also hosted by PokerStars, posted similar figures.

Nearly $1.8 million was awarded in 96 events that featured over 33,000 entries, easily becoming the most successful tourney in the championship’s five-year history in the Garden State.

New Jersey’s Main Event itself included 620 entries that led to a $173,600 prize pool. The champ pocketed more than $30,000.

Michigan casinos struggling amid pandemic

It’s no secret that the nation’s retail gaming industry has suffered immensely since the coronavirus forced shutdowns. Michigan provides a microcosm of the struggle.

Bridge Magazine published a report detailing the continued closures of the state’s 23 tribal casinos, which have been shuttered since March 22 and will remain as such until at least May 15.

While other states have benefited from online gambling to at least maintain some sort of revenue stream, Michigan has land-based gaming only, for now. As such, the tail end of March and April concluded without a single legal wager made.

Without operational casinos, tribes are unable to fund services such as health, education and law enforcement, among other areas. Really, casinos provide a vast majority of funding for tribes.

For example, Bridge noted that as much as 60% of the budget for the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community stems from the Ojibwa Casino. Similarly, some 75% of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe is backed by gaming revenue.

The rest of the state certainly misses casinos, considering those properties have contributed more than $30 million to local governments and over $54 million to the state in 2019.

Some relief coming for smaller casinos

While the pandemic has made it difficult for businesses to stay afloat, the Small Business Administration recently updated its guidelines for Payroll Protection Program loans that exclude small US gambling businesses.

Translation: Smaller casinos could receive loans to pay wages, utilities and rent during the shutdown.

The update came as Congress funneled $310 billion to fund the program.

Initially, “small businesses” were defined as establishments with less than 500 employees, which makes them available to receive up to $10 million or 2 ½ months of payroll, whichever is less. The trouble, however, stemmed from the SBA classifying gambling businesses as risky and “of poor character,” thus preventing that industry from receiving aid.

Now, though, guidelines dictate that any business eligible for a loan is not be overlooked based on gambling-related income.

That said, those businesses must vie with many, many others in various industries to acquire such help. Some 30 million small businesses exist in the country, and the money released by Congress is enough for just 31,000 loans at the max payout.

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Need For LA:Middle Infielders More Need Than Half A Season To Work Together Into A Championship Team

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All throughout the world of baseball, writers and pundits are applauding the acquisitions of the Dodgers. At the trade deadline Los Angeles landed two veteran All-Stars to improve their middle infield, hoping that this duo would lead last year’s National League Champs to their first World Series title since 1986.

Brian Dozier, who recently set a record for home runs by a second baseman, came to the West Coast in a deal with the Minnesota Twins. Just the day before, Los Angeles made a transaction to get slugging shortstop Manny Machado from the Baltimore Orioles.

Most likely those acquisitions will help the offense of the Dodgers, but they could very well negatively affect what happens on the diamond. Both Machado and Dozier have more than proven their defensive skills, having won several Gold Gloves between them.

However, baseball history seems to indicate that middle infielders need a lot of time playing together before they can win it all. A look back at the most recent Novembers provides insight into just how important it is that the second baseman and shortstop spend more than simply a few months together.

Last year Houston had the phenomenal pair of Jose Altuve and Carlos Correa, who have been playing side by side for an extended period. Twelve months before the Cubs had youngsters Javier Baez and Addison Russell, who had become acclimated to one another the previous season.

The year before veterans Omar Infante and Alcides Escobar looked after the middle of the diamond for a second straight season, helping the Kansas City Royals to their first World Series title in thirty years. The connected middle infield, combined with a superb and deep bullpen, took the Series from the New York Mets.

That tandem had come close in 2014, when the Royals won the pennant but lost to the Giants in the Fall Classic. San Francisco’s middle infielders had only been together since just before the All Star break, rookie Joe Panik getting called up to the Big Leagues to take over second base in late June.

Fortunately for the Giants, they had a veteran Gold Glove winner at shortstop to help his young double play partner get acclimated. Brandon Crawford more than fulfilled that role, having already played on San Francisco championship teams in 2010 and 2012.

For additional evidence of the importance of a well -connected shortstop and second baseman, one can look back even further. In the Nineties the Yankees dominated the baseball postseason, anchored by shortstop Derek Jeter and his double play partner Chuck Knoblauch.

How about the decade before that? The Detroit Tigers teams of the Reagan Era enjoyed the luxury of having Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker playing side by side, highlighted by a World Series title in 1984. In the Seventies the Big Red Machine was driven by having shortstop Dave Concepcion and second baseman Joe Morgan for extended seasons, culminating in back to back championships in 1975 and 1976.

You can find many more examples in the annals of baseball, but do you know what is much harder to find? The answer is a single team that has gone on to win the World Series after having replaced both shortstop and second base in the middle of the season, which is what the Dodgers are hoping to accomplish this year.

Dozier did hit a home run in each of his first two games with Los Angeles, and Machado collected four hits. Baseball history, however, seems to suggest that the newcomers will need more than two months together to carry their team to the ultimate goal.

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Source by Doug Poe