Tag: Horses

Find the Benefits For Horses – Using Gymnastics’s Jumping Exercises

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Everyone knows how important stretching, using different muscle groups as well as constantly working on increasing and maintaining flexibility is for humans. Not surprisingly it is equally if not more important for horses, regardless of the type of work that they will be required to do. Sport or jumping horses and those that are competitively ridden need to work on flexibility and muscle development just the same as pleasure horses that are used for the occasional weekend event or ride.

The great news is that working any type of horse through a gymnastics routine will increase the horse’s control, energy levels and flexibility. It will also help the rider focus on the horse’s position during the jump, as well as how to improve their own riding skills. Since the goal of the gymnastics program is to increase the horse’s balance, jump and landing as well as increase the self-carriage of the horse, injuries and stress on the horse will decrease through the use of gymnastics as a core part of training.

All horse gymnastic programs start with basic, simple jumps and trots between jumps, ideal for horses that are unfamiliar with the routine. Initially poles are used in place of jumps, allowing the horse and rider to trot through, focusing on having the horse develop control and flexibility in approaching the poles and then later the jumps. Poles are then combined with low jumps, allowing the horse both a warm up as well as a prelude to the actual gymnastics program. This trot jump, which is often done as an isolated exercise, helps cue the horse and also helps the rider to focus on correct positioning, following the horse and using leg control to help the horse with carriage, balance and landing.

The benefit of using a gymnastic type approach to training is that the positioning of the jumps and poles is strategic. They are placed so that the horse is cued to transition weight to make the jump, plus it also encourages the horse to continuously be thinking about what he or she is doing. Through these controlled but low level jump exercises the horse and rider develop a unified sense of balance and control, with the horse also developing an increased flexibility and response to the rider.

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Source by Cathy Barrea

Horse Riding – Why Walk Is the Most Important Gait for Your Horse’s Performance

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How your horse carries himself (his frame) while he is being ridden affects his physical and mental state. For him to be able to perform at his best requires that he is supple, balanced and has strong back muscles to comfortably carry the saddle and rider without stress or strain. Your horse needs to work in the correct posture or “frame” to be able to perform at his best.

A good riding frame begins with a good walk. A good walk:

  • is the most difficult gait to achieve
  • is the easiest to destroy
  • has even, active, rhythmical steps with impulsion
  • can only be achieved with supple muscles, a swinging back and flexible joints.

If your horse is stressed or has tense muscles, he cannot achieve a good walk.

To create a good walk, you must encourage your horse to push forward energetically from his hindquarters so that his hind legs step well underneath him. It is important that you release any tension in your own body. Soften from your neck to your seat bones as well as all your joints (shoulders, elbows, wrists, hips, knees, ankles & toes). Keep your core engaged. Your horse will mirror what he feels from you. Maintain a supple, following contact on long reins.

If your horse will not go forward into the contact, hollows his back, takes short “sewing machine” steps or rushes into trot, work him on a 20 metre circle. This way you can encourage him to bend more around your inside leg. Feel and follow the natural swing of your horse’s barrel. Keep your legs gently contacting the barrel and give a stronger push with your inside leg as you feel his barrel swing outward. Ensure your outside leg is soft so that it follows and does not block the movement. The bend helps your horse relax and lower his neck which helps lift his back to level. At the same time, your seat asks your horse to step forward.

Be careful not to tense up the hips or arms as you increase your push. Your hips move in a figure eight pattern following your horse’s natural movement – dropping side to side with the movement of the barrel and moving forward with the steps of the hind legs. Your arms maintain soft, supple contact allowing your horse to stretch. If your horse’s walk is choppy or he wants to rush into trot, add a half halt by taking back your outside shoulder (without pulling back on the rein) as your horse’s outside shoulder comes forward. Be careful not to move your elbow back behind the mid-line of your body as this creates a pull on the reins which will cause too much pressure in your horse’s mouth. Repeat the half halt as necessary but only on that one beat.

As your horse develops a good, relaxed walk with impulsion, swing and suppleness on the circle in one direction then work on the other direction. You may find your horse finds it easier going one way than the other. This is normal because horse’s are left or right sided the same as we are left or right handed. If you or your horse get frustrated or tense going one way, go back to the direction where the work was easier until you get relaxed again. Once you have developed a good walk with some consistency on the circles then you can start to do some work on the straight line coming back to the circle to re-establish relaxation whenever necessary.

At first you work with your horse in a long and low frame. As his strength builds, you can gradually ask him to come onto the bit by taking shorter contact as you increase his impulsion. When he has developed consistency in the walk, you can begin to ask him for transitions to trot but only moving up to the trot when he stays level with a lifted back.

Whether you are a pleasure or competitive rider, if you want your horse to remain sound, perform to the best of his ability and enjoy his job, he needs to develop physical strength, suppleness and balanced movement. His emotional state of mind is just as important. Only if he feels relaxed and confident in your partnership with the proper frame of body and of mind can he truly be your willing partner.

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Source by Anne Gage

Categories: Sports Betting

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Betting Advice – Horse Racing System Stats – Odds on Horses

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Horse racing systems are frequently based on research and statistics. Without them, building a horse racing system would be a lot more complicated. I use a lot of programs and Internet resources for my own research, but this can be very expensive and run into hundreds each month. So in order to present you a bit of a helping hand I have listed a number of helpful statistics beneath:

+Odds On Horses+

The vast majority of people seem to think odds on horses are unbeatable or bad value. Neither is true, they get beaten pretty often, and as for value if you get a Pattern winning horse running in a Seller at 1/5, that is potentially decent value.

A quick statistic now:

58% of odds on horses win their races on the flat.

54% win on the AW (All Weather). That 4% difference makes quite a difference, so pay closer attention to short-priced racehorses on this surface.

Splitting all flat races into race type with the percentage of winning odds on runners:
4+ & all age H/c’s – 48%
Specific age H/c’s – 53%
Claimers – 56%
2yo Sellers – 56%
3yo Seller – 60%
Other Sellers – 56%
3yo & all age Maidens – 59%
2yo Maidens – 61%
2yo condition races – 62%
3yo & all age condition races – 57%

All the above based on statistics over 5 years.

This will confidently give you a little help in pointing out prospective odds on winners.

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+5f Sprint Favourites +

In reply to a query I was sent with regard to how many odds on favourites win 5f sprints:

Over the last 16 years,

Handicap – 23% – 924/3960 – #376.62 Loss
Claimer/Auction – 35% – 420/1208 – #89.98 Loss
Non-Handicap – 35% – 779/220 – #233.10 Loss
Group or Maiden – 38% – 878/2310 – #175.09 Loss

Sprints are not really good for odds on runners, you ought to be looking at them in 1 mile and upwards races. Also using the betting exchanges will provide better prices on some, but in a number of cases once you deduct the commission you can have a lower price than the bookies offer.

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+Winners last time out – Flat+

Just some quick basic stats for the flat from 10 years of statistics:

Last time out winners win 17.45% next time out

Horses that won there last 2 races win 21.52% next time out

Winners of there last 3 win 24.81%

Last 4 win 26.25%

Last 5 win 29.17%

Last 6 win 38.24

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+Winners last time out – National Hunt+

Source – 10 years all NH races run under rules. Chances of horse winning next time out:

Last time out winner – 23.61%
Won last 2 – 29%
Won last 3 – 33.89%
Won last 4 – 37.65%
Won last 5 – 39.64%
Won last 6 – 38.53%

Compared to the flat, sequence winners over jumps have a much bigger probability of winning again.

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+Nursery Top Weights+

A Nursery is a Handicap race for 2 year old’s.

I read a comment in the RFO (Racing and Football Outlook newspaper) from one of their ‘tipsters’, that ‘top weight’s in Nurseries are always worth a second look.

Now me being what I am, I wanted to test this wonderful theory, as this is how we learn, so I ran it through my software.

As normal with this type of media information it is shot down in flames.

Over the last 16 years:

Qualifiers: 2459
Winners: 359
Strike-rate: 14.56%
Loss: -#461
Average loss per year: -#28

Only 1996 showed a profit of #36, clearly a coincidence.

Not very good is it? Obviously it’s the media giving the typical punter the normal worthless myths.

Remember, when you hear media remarks such as ‘horses for courses’, ‘always back the outsider of 3’, etc, the opposite is regularly true.

These stats ought to help you develop your method betting, and go towards building a horse racing system.

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Source by Keith Driscoll

Categories: Sports Betting

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